Callaway razr fit driver

Callaway RAZR Fit Driver Review

Hi Everyone – thanks for stopping by. Today we are reviewing the Callaway RAZR Fit Driver. This driver offers optimal adjustability and is perfect for the golfer who enjoys futzing with their clubs to find optimal situational performance.

LooksCallaway razr fit driver

The RAZR Fit catches your eye with a glossy black finish and has a slightly deeper face than previous models. It is loaded with technology for the player who likes to tinker with their equipment. The RAZR Fit features an OptiFit hosel that adjusts the face angle in an open, square, and closed position. In addition, on the sole there are two weight ports on the toe and heel. The OptiFit weights (12 grams and 2 grams) shift the center of gravity to promote a draw or neutral ball flight. The club I tested was a 10.5 degree driver with a stock Aldila Rip shaft in stiff flex. Callaway did an awesome job with the appearance of the club and I rate it 9 out of 10.

Performance

Currently, I play the RAZR Hawk driver so I was eager to try the RAZR Fit. After only a few swings, I realized the RAZR Fit is one of the longest drivers I have tested. The ball jumped off the club face and hit towering drives. The ball flight was extremely high, yet the ball just carried forever. I was hitting it easily 15 yards longer that my RAZR Hawk. It won’t be long before the RAZR Fit will make its way into my bag.

I tested the RAZR Fit in the square, open and closed position. The OptiFit weights stayed in the neutral position, 2 grams in the heel and 12 grams in the toe. In the closed position, the ball flight never produced a gentle draw. It was either a hook or straight shot. However, the trajectory did come down slightly in the closed position. In the open position I managed to still hit it straight or with a slight fade. Unlike the closed position, the open position never made a significant change in ball flight. Overall, I preferred the neutral position. In the neutral position, the ball flight started straight and finished straight. The RAZR Fit hit the ball great in the correct setting and therefore I rate it 10 out of 10.

Feel

Callaway did a great job with the RAZR Fit driver. Impact makes more of a crack than the dull sound produced by previous models. The ball just takes off at impact, regardless of where I struck the ball on the club face. The weighting of the club feels nice. In fact, the swing weight is a D6 and the Aldila shaft weighs 60 grams. The club feels great throughout the swing and impact giving it a rating of 9 out of 10.

Value

The RAZR Fit is on the more expensive side with a price tag of $399. However, it is in line with the other adjustable drivers such as the R11s and the Titleist D2 and D3 drivers. The RAZR Fit outperformed the RAZR Hawk and it will most likely make it’s way into my bag. I really liked the RAZR Fit driver, it should be one of the top performing and selling drivers with a 10 out of 10 rating.

Callaway-Razr-X-black-driver

Good Morning – TGIF! Hope everyone had a wonderful week, today we have another review for you. The Callaway RAZR X Black Driver combines a sleek look with user-friendly performance. Here’s our take on it.

Look

callaway razr black

The Callaway RAZR X Black driver features a sleek aerodynamic design with a glossy black finish.  The crown utilizes a red alignment aid.  In fact, the lines actually remind me of the TaylorMade Burner (2008) design from a few years ago.  The RAZR X Black is a 460 cc forged composite club head with a slightly open club face.  However, the face angle directly correlates to the loft of the driver.  The lower lofted drivers are slightly open and the higher lofted drivers are slightly closed.  The RAZR X Black has looks easy to hit and the glossy finish gives the club an elegant and stylish appearance.  The RAZR X Black rates 9 out of 10 in terms of appearance.

Performance

I tested the Callaway 9.5° RAZR X Black with a stock Fujikura Motore F8 stiff shaft.  I found the RAZR X Black an extremely easy club to hit.  Callaway designed the RAZR X Black with no adjustable features.  The RAZR X Black produces a high ball flight and relatively straight shots.  The club is very consistent.  Nearly all shots produced a straight shot or slight fade.  The RAZR X Black delivered an average distance for most shots.  Off center hits on the heel or toe were still decent shots,resulting in a slight loss of distance.  Other drivers might produce longer shots or allow you more control in terms of ball flight.  However, the best way to describe the RAZR X Black is easy and consistent.  The driver is perfect for someone who just wants to set up and swing rather than tinker with a bunch of adjustments.  Performance rates 8 out of 10.

Feel

The Callaway RAZR X Black driver offers plenty of forgiveness.  Impact produces a solid crack, rather than the dull and muted sound of previous models.  The weight of the club feels nice.  In fact, I thought the driver was lighter than the actual swing weight of D5.  Impact feels good and the off center hits still travel well.  It is an all-round solid performing club from Callaway and rates 8 out of 10.

Value

The appearance, feel, performance and sound of the RAZR X Black is solid.  While most drivers carry a retail value of $299 or higher, the RAZR X Black reverses the trend with a retail value of $249.99.  In addition, players will enjoy the simplicity of the RAZR X Black.  The lack of adjustments make it user friendly.  If you want a club that easily gets the job done the RAZR X Black is definitely worth considering.  The value of the RAZR X Black rates 10 out of 10 for the less expensive price tag and above average performance.

Image credits: http://goo.gl/Rd7lxX | http://goo.gl/OnJ0JL

cobra-amp-cell-driver

Hey everyone, thanks for stopping by.  Today we’re sharing with you a review of the revolutionary Cobra AMP Cell driver from our independent reviewer. Let’s get to it.

Look

Cobra Amp Cell DriverPurchasing a driver just got easier.  Cobra is attempting to revolutionize the golf industry with the AMP CELL driver.  The AMP CELL is loaded with new technology, highlighted by Cobra’s MyFly Technology that provides the ability to change the setup to six different loft settings.

True to the new direction of the company, brighter is better with numerous color options.  Basically, all you need to do is choose from an orange, blue, red or silver club head.  Once you select the color you prefer, set the loft to fit your individual preference.  Lofts can be adjusted between 8.5 and 11.5 degrees.  Finally, select the shaft.  Choosing a driver has never been so easy.

The club sets up at address square thanks to Cobra’s SmartPad Techology.  The SmartPad creates a square face at address regardless of loft setting.  In addition, players will have the ability to open or close the club face.

Aesthetically, the Amp Cell is designed with a traditional club head design.  I tested the silver color driver, which has a black club face with orange grooves.  The club looks easy to hit, sets up perfect with several color choices.  If I had any complaint, it would be nice to see a black option.

Performance

I tested the Cobra AMP Cell driver in the 9.5 degree loft setting with the stock Fujikura Fuel shaft in stiff flex.  While I tested the silver club head, my preferred color choice is the royal blue or dark red club head.  Results were better than I expected with the AMP CELL driver.  Distance is about average compared to the other new drivers this year.  The AMP CELL delivered a straight ball flight that typically resulted in a mid to high trajectory.

In addition, I tested a few balls in the 9.5 degree setting with a draw bias.  Unfortunately results were not as consistent, with several shots missing right of the target and a few even a big sweeping 20-30 yard draw.  Ball flight also tended to be slightly higher in this setting.  Although I was just experimenting, it became much more difficult to control the ball with the draw bias.

Overall, the AMP CELL driver is a very easy club to look at and hit.  When it comes down to it, this new driver passes the ‘would I put this club in my bag test’ with flying colors.

Feel

The Cobra AMP CELL driver feels nice at address with a D4 swing weight and a 60 gram stock Fujikura Fuel shaft.  The club looks cool and delivers a consistent result, impact creates a firm feel with a softer sound.  The ball feels average off the club face, many other drivers feel like the ball jumps off the club face, and the AMP CELL does not replicate the trampoline feel off the club face.  Regardless, it still provides solid hits.  Personally, the look and results significantly outweigh an average impact sensation, so despite this, I’m still a big fan of this driver.

Value

Historically, Cobra has developed a solid niche for senior and women’s equipment.  Since Puma bought Cobra, the products are geared toward golfers of all skill levels and age groups.  Therefore, in the past I have not been a big fan of Cobra products for my own game, but now Cobra delivers a solid line up for every age group and ability level.  The AMP CELL is competitively priced and retails with a standard price tag of $299.  In addition, the AMP CELL will attract plenty of attention for it’s fresh look and solid performance.  In my opinion, the AMP CELL is one of the more exciting products available on the market today at a price like this.  A steal for anyone in the market for a driver that has great performance for great value.

g25-header

Hey everyone thanks for stopping by.  After a brief hiatus while I got a chance to play some rounds of golf with my dad up in the mountains, I’m back at it here on SirShanksAlot.  We hope you’re enjoying the season!  Today, we’re sharing with you another independent review of the Ping G25 Driver. Our reviewer seems to be a fan, so I might have to give this driver a try, but I have to say, if this past week was any indication, it’s going to take something really special to oust my current driver from my bag. Well, let’s get to the review…

Looks

g25-driverThe entire Ping G25 lineup is simplified with less lines and color schemes. Upon first glance, the simple appearance of the G25 is easy on the eyes. In fact, the all black matte non-glare finish with white grooves on the club face looks great. Ping’s traditional crescent alignment aid is all white and really pops with the black club head. Ping’s ultra thin crown technology distributes weight to the perimeter and positions the CG lower and farther back in the club head. A noticeable weight is positioned on the bottom of the sole toward the back of the club head.

The Ping G25 driver is an oversize 460 cc club head with a triangular shape. The G25 is Ping’s first product in the adjustable head category and allows you to add or subtract one half degree of loft to optimize launch conditions for ‘maximum distance’. While other clubs have several adjustable features, the G25 keeps it simple. In addition, the G25 has one of the smoothest shaft sleeves ever making any alterations extremely easy.

The Ping G25 driver looks really cool… until you put the club down at address: the face looks open. Grrr… Personally, I struggled with the address where I felt the club would produce a wild slice or snap hook. It was my only real complaint about the looks of this driver.

Performance

I tested the Ping G25 9.5 degree driver with a stiff TFC 189D shaft. The TFC 189D is the stock shaft that weighs 58 grams with 4.8 degrees of torque engineered to produce a mid ball flight. When it comes to these shafts, which in comes in five models from soft regular to tour x-stiff, the more flexible the shaft, the higher the ball flight it produced.

The G25 driver stands out as one of my top two drivers tested in 2013. While I did not prefer the aesthetics of the driver at address, the club performs awesomely. The G25 bombs the ball long and straight which should immediately make the driver a top choice for anyone in the market. It delivers a high and piercing ball flight, that goes for miles. I was very impressed.

Additionally, I tested the driver in a few of the other available positions. Adding one half degree of loft resulted in a slightly higher trajectory and a little inconsistency compared to its previous position. Reducing the loft by a half degree produced mostly straight shots or a slight draw. Strangely enough, subtracting loft produced better results than adding loft. Shots were longer and straighter. Typically, a club is more forgiving by adding loft, so I was a little surprised by my results. Overall, this driver’s consistency, distance, feel and trajectory were all winners in my book.

Feel

The Ping G25 features a D3 swing weight. The club feels great and the ball jumps off the club face better than any other driver I’ve hit tested so far this year. The driver produces a loud impact sound and feels and sounds like you crush the ball every time. In fact, the impact will make your ears ring. The ball feels solid at impact and Ping did a nice job of combining feel and performance in the G25 driver.

Value

This driver’s performance is definitely not mirrored in it’s price – just another admiring quality.  With a standard (if not low) price of $299. this driver really is a steal for anyone looking to get more out of their driver. If you are on the market for a new driver don’t skip a demo of the Ping G25.

 

tm-rocketballz-2-woods

Good afternoon everyone, and thanks for stopping by.  We’ve got another independent review of the new 2013 offering from Taylormade up next – the RocketBallz Stage 2 Driver. This new driver is said to be a leg up on the original Rocketballz, but we’ll let our reviewer take a closer look.  Enjoy!

Look

taylormade-rocketballz-stage-2-tour-driverTaylorMade made their original RocketBallz clubs RocketBallzier with the release of the Stage 2 line.  The updated appearance features a yellow and gray color scheme on top of the white club head with black club face and sole.  The 460 cc club head looks easy to hit at address with a similar design as the previous RocketBallz driver.  In addition, TaylorMade positioned a weight behind the club face to lower the CG, promote faster ball speeds with a higher launch and low spin.  The TaylorMade Loft-Sleeve offers 7 standard and 5 upright loft options where golfers can alter add or decrease 1.5 degrees of loft.  The trendy line is a nice update from the original RocketBallz line but overall the club looks very similar to the original.

 

Performance 

I tested the TaylorMade Stage 2 driver in the 9.5 degree stock Fujikura RocketFuel shaft in stiff flex.  Results yielded a high ball flight, exactly what the club and light weight shaft is designed to do.  I tried the Stage 2 driver on a number of occasions and never found consistent results similar to the original RocketBallz driver.  If the original RocketBallz driver was in my bag, I probably would not make the upgrade.  Solid hits produced good distance with a fairly straight and high ball flight.  Misses produced a higher ball flight that tended to drift to the right.  Personally, I preferred the Stage 2 over the R1.  However, the Stage 2 fell short of my expectations overall.

 

Feel

Impact felt really nice and produced a louder sound (than the R1) with very soft club face.  The softer impact sensation feels like the ball springs off the club face.  The ultra light shaft is designed to promote faster swing speed, and definitely helps with feeling that sensation.

The Stage 2 driver features a D6 swing weight with a lightweight Fujikura RocketFuel shaft that weighs 51 grams with 4.5 degrees of torque.  The lighter shaft makes it easy to feel the club head throughout the swing.  The RocketBallz Stage 2 driver feels great throughout the swing and impact – and I was a big fan.

 

Value

The TaylorMade Stage 2 driver retails for a standard $299 price.  In my opinion, the driver was more consistent and felt better than the R1 driver, so Taylormade has a win on that front.  However, in comparison to other models, like the original RBZ, I felt this club was sort of a let down.  The Stage 2 driver is definitely worth a try, and at only a $299 pricetag will get you pretty solid results for a low price.

taylormade-r1

Good afternoon everyone, today we’re going to share with you a review of the much debated TaylorMade R1 Driver.  This new driver got blasted for its appearance by many on the web, but still managed to garner a rather large tour following – is it simply sponsorship dollars t work? In this review we dive a little deeper into the TaylorMade R1 with our independent review.  We hope you enjoy this review of the TaylorMade R1 driver. Let’s get to it.

 Look

Based on research conducted from thousands of club fittings, 80% of golfers are playing the wrong loft on their driver.  TaylorMade introduces the R1 driver, which comes with 12 different loft combinations.  In addition, the R1 allows users to alter loft, face angle and design their shot shape.  The only thing golfers need to worry about is selecting the correct shaft flex (and discovering what actual loft, face angle and weight distribution is actually right for their game).

The appearance of the R1 features an athletic and flashy look.  The black club face, white club head with orange and gray stripe pattern looks sharp and does a nice job of framing the ball at address.  The club features adjustable weights on the heel and toe with the adjustable face angle positioned towards the back of the sole.  The loft sleeve allows for 12 adjustable settings between 8 and 12 degrees.  In my opinion, the appearance of the R1 is one of it’s best qualities.

Performance

The R1 is TaylorMade’s most technologically advanced driver and can be extremely difficult to understand.  TaylorMade designed an app called R1 tuning available for download on smartphones.  The app is extremely easy to use, just enter the current settings, follow the prompts by selecting shot options and the tuning app will recommend settings to achieve the desired results.

I tested the TaylorMade R1 with the stock Aldila RIP Phenom 55 stiff shaft.  In addition, testing utilized a draw bias in the 9.5 degree with the face angle in a neutral, 2 degree open and 2 degree closed position.  In the neutral position, shots were generally a mid ball flight.  Poor shots tended to miss off to the right and good shots resulted in a straight or right to left ball flight.  Altering the face angle produced different trajectories and results.  The closed club face caught my eye as the most attractive setting.  Closing the club face 2 degrees generally resulted in a higher ball flight with a slight draw.  Again, missed shots typically ended up to the right of the target.  Opening the face angle 2 degrees produced the worst and most inconsistent results.  Ball flight was typically low and resulted in several snap hooks.  Even on good hits in any setting, the club felt like it lacked any pop and never produced long or exciting drives.  Overall, I was not very impressed with the results of this big stick.

Feel

The slightly heavier club head and lighter shaft feels fantastic.  The Aldila Rip Phenom shaft weighs 58 grams with 3.4 degrees of torque with a overall swing weight of D4.  Impact produces a dull sound with a hard feel across the club face.  In my opinion, the highlight of the R1 is the weighting options, but the drawback could be the firm feel at impact.  On that note though, I was also able to test the TaylorMade Stage 2 driver and it produced a slightly louder sound at impact a much more desirable softer feel across the club face (we’ll get into that review soon).  So overall, I felt the feeling of this driver left something to be desired.

Value

The idea behind the R1 is outstanding.  Buy one club and make any adjustment necessary to help produce a desirable ball flight.  The R1 will be one of the most popular drivers available for it’s versatility (and the fact that TaylorMade is behind it).  The expensive $399 retail price is in line with other technological advanced drivers.  While I think it is an improvement from the previous R11s, I personally did not get that excited about the performance.  With the expensive price tag and average performance, I would recommend people give some serious consideration before forking out the dough for this driver.

11810259-titleist

Hey everyone, we’ve also took some time to review the D3 driver, and compare it to the D2.  In a nutshell, the D3 is for better quality players who prefer the ability to work the ball over some added forgiveness.  Our independent reviewer struggled a bit with the shafts on this review, as they tended to produce to low of a ball flight overall than the D2.  The driver itself is designed this way, so better players looking to get more height on their tee-shots may want to steer clear of the D3, or get a shaft combo with a really low kick point.  Enjoy the review below!

913d3-titleistLook

The 445 cc club head of the Titleist 913 D3 driver should appeal to the player that prefers a slightly smaller club head.  In addition, the traditional pear shape is visually appealing.  Similar to the 913 D2, the glossy black finish looks great at address.  The 913 D3 has a similar design as the 910 D3, however, you will notice a few glaring differences on the sole.  The rear weight is bigger, the sole plate is all black and the trim of the 913 is silver and red.  Similar to the 910 D3, Titleist continues with their SureFit technology which allows you to alter the lie and loft.  Golfers can also control the weight and shot trajectory by altering the removable weight in the back of the club head.

Feel

The Titleist 913 D3 is relatively forgiving and easy to hit.  Similar to the Titleist 913 D2, the D3 produces the same feel, crisp contact and muted sound at impact.  Off center hits still feel solid with very little unwanted vibrations.  Adjust the swing weight for your personal preference with the SureFit interchangeable weights.

Performance

aldila-rip-shaft

I tested the Titleist 913 D3 in a 9.5 degree loft with a stiff Aldila α Rip 60 stock shaft.  All shots were hit in the A-1 SureFit position and standard rear weight.  The Aldila α Rip 60 features a 63 gram shaft and 2.9 degrees of torque designed to produce a low to mid ball flight.  The D3 is designed for the player who prefers the ability to work the ball.  Overall, the D3 is perfect for the player who wants a lower ball flight.  Most shots with the D3 club head produced a low or mid trajectory.

The Aldila α Rip 60 produced a mid ball flight with the 913 D3 driver head.  In addition, the workability in the D3 is apparent.  The 913 D3 does not offer the forgiveness of the D2.  It is much easier to spray the ball left or right.  Many of the misses with the D3 were low and left with a right to left ball flight.  Personally, I found the D2 produced a higher trajectory, more forgiving and longer than the D3.  However, some will enjoy the ability to work the ball and prefer the D3.

Titleist 913 D3 Review with Other Stock Shafts

All stock shafts were tested with a stiff shaft and a Titleist 913 D3 driver in the standard A-1 SureFit position.  The D3 was tested with the standard rear weight.  The Titleist Bassara W 40 and Bassara W 50 are not listed as an available stock shaft in the Titleist 913 D3 driver.

Aldila RIP Phenom 70

rip-phenom-shaft

The Aldila RIP Phenom weighs 74 grams with 3.2 degrees of torque.  The Aldila RIP Phenom 70 stock shaft is designed to produce low to mid ball flight. Combined with the 913 D3 club head, ball flight was extremely low but stayed mostly straight.  However, the Aldila RIP Phenom 70 shaft felt like there was no kick at impact.  Carry distance was poor but at least the ball stayed in the short grass.  Similar to the 913 D2, the D3 with the Aldila RIP Phenom 70 is not a great match for my swing characteristics.

Diamana S+ Blue 62

diamana-shaft

The Diamana S+ Blue 62 is 64 grams with a 4.5 degree torque.  The Diamana Blue is designed to deliver a mid ball flight.  Testing the 913 D3 with the Diamana Blue resulted in a low to mid ball flight.  Similar to the Aldila RIP Phenom, the majority of shots were straight.  However, the Diamana Blue produced better distance than the Aldila RIP Phenom.

Diamana D+ White 72

diamana-white

The Diamana D+ White 72 shaft features a 74 gram shaft with 3.3 degree torque.  The Diamana D+ White 72 is designed to produce a low ball flight.  Consequently, most shots were a low to mid trajectory.  Personally, I struggled with consistency with the Diamana D+ White 72 combination.  Again, misses were left and low while good shots were straight with a low or mid ball flight.  Carry distance was average with the Diamana D+ White 72 stock shaft.

Value

The Titleist 913 D3 offers a smaller club head design and great look at address.  In addition, the 913 D3 allows the ability to work the ball.  The Titleist 913 D3 is ideal for players that struggle with a high launch and ball flight.  The D3 only offers 4 stock shafts but should be easy to find the best match for your swing.  The Titleist 913 D3 retails for $399.99.

 

 

titleist-913-D2-driver

Hey everyone, thanks for stopping by, today we’ve got an in-depth review of the Titleist 913 D2 driver.  In this independent review, we also asked our reviewer to test out the effects on ball flight, accuracy and distance when trying different shafts.  Enjoy the review below!

Look

913 D2 Driver Review
The Titleist 913 D2 features a 460 cc club head with a full pear shape design.  The glossy black finish looks spectacular.  The 913 D2 features a new sole plate design with an all black finish and  the red and silver trim on the sole looks sharp.  The SureFit technology allows you to alter the loft and lie.  In addition, the D2 removable pentagon shape rear weight is larger than the previous circular 910 D2 weight.  The Titleist Tour Velvet 360 degree rubber grip is the standard grip available with the 913 D2 driver.  Overall, a fantastic club to look at.

Feel

The D2 feels balanced in address and throughout the swing.   The removable weight allows you to control the weight of the club head.  Adjust the swing weight by purchasing individual weights or the SureFit Tour Weight Kit that includes 4, 7, 9, 11 and 14 gram interchangeable weights.  Over the last few years, many drivers produced a loud or high pitch sound at impact.  The Titleist 913 D2 feels very solid at impact with a crisp, yet dull sound at impact.  The D2 clubface feels firm at impact on sweet shots or off center hits.  The club feels great throughout the swing and allows you to alter the swing weight for a personalized feel.

Performance

aldila-rip-shaft

I tested the Titleist 913 D2 in a 9.5 degree loft with a stiff Aldila α Rip 60 stock shaft.  All shots were hit in the A-1 SureFit position and standard weight.  The D2 is very easy to play and favors a slight draw bias.  Generally the D2 is extremely forgiving and delivers a straight ball flight, a solid carry distance with a mid to high ball trajectory.  With my normal shot pattern straight to slight fade, I was surprised to hit a shot pattern that was straight to slight draw.  The D2 is forgiving and easy to hit, however, still offers the ability to work the ball.  Most players will probably enjoy the ability to keep the ball on fairway with the 913 D2.

Titleist 913 D2 Review with Other Stock Shafts

All stock shafts were tested with a stiff shaft and a Titleist 913 D2 driver in the standard A-1 SureFit position and standard weight.

Aldila RIP Phenom 70

rip-phenom-shaft

The Aldila RIP Phenom 70 is 74 grams in weight and features 3.2 degrees torque.  The Aldila RIP Phenom is designed to deliver a low to mid ball flight.  It did not disappoint.  In fact, ball trajectory was more on the low side.  With the low ball flight, carry distance was average at best.  However, ball flight was generally straight, probably correlating to the forgiveness of the 913 D2 club head.  The Aldila RIP Phenom 70 is gaining popularity and many tour professionals have even switched, most notably Ian Poulter and Fredrik Jacobsen.  Based on my results, the Aldila RIP Phenom 70 is not the best match for my swing, however, it should be a good match for someone who sprays the ball and searching for a lower ball flight.

Diamana S+ Blue 62

diamana-shaft

The Diamana S+ Blue 62 is 64 grams with 4.5 degrees of torque.  The Diamana Blue is designed to deliver a mid ball flight.  I enjoyed some of the best results with the Diamana Blue.  The Diamana Blue and Aldila α Rip 60 performed almost identically and both produced a high ball flight combined with the best carry distance.  While it was not as straight as the Aldila RIP Phenom or Diamana D+ White 72, it was much longer with a high ball flight.

Diamana D+ White 72

diamana-white

Unlike what the name suggests, the Diamana D+ White 72 shaft is black shaft.  It features a heavier weight with 74 grams and 3.3 degrees of torque designed to deliver a low ball flight.  The results were very similar to the Aldila RIP Phenom 70.  The Diamana D+ White 72 delivered a low and very straight shot.  Shots were like a knuckleballs coming off the clubface.  Since the launch is low, the carry distance was significantly less than some of the other stock shaft options.

Titleist Bassara W 50

bassara-shaft

The stock Titleist Bassara W 50 shaft is the lightest shaft at 51 grams and highest torque with 5.2 degrees.  The Bassara is designed to produce a high ball flight.  The Bassara stands out from the others shafts with a bright red color scheme.  Performance is very solid with a mid to high trajectory.  Ball flight is very straight, long and is one of the top performers among the stock shaft options.

Titleist Bassara W 40

Titleist did not forget about the women.  The Titleist Bassara W 40 is specifically designed for women.  It is only available in a ladies flex.  The Bassara W 40 is a 45 gram shaft with 7.1 degrees of torque.  This is the only shaft I did not test (as the review wouldn’t do much good to anyone with my swing), however, the Bassara W 40 is engineered to produce a high ball flight.

Value

The Titleist 913 D2 offers a clean look and easy to hit driver.  With 6 stock shafts it should be easy to find a match for your swing.  Overall, the D2 is forgiving, long and a great option for the upcoming season.  The Titleist 913 D2 retails for $399.99.

 

 

 

 

VR_S-Driver-redo

nike_vrs_driver_heroHey everyone, thanks for stopping by, today we’ve got a review of the Nike VR_S Driver for you.  This driver was released early in 2012, and was the next generation of the Machspeed line, incorporating many of it’s technological enhancements – like the aerodynamic properties. Let’s get to the review…

Looks

Compared to previous drivers Nike delivered a more traditional pear shape design with the release of the 460 cc Nike VR_S Str8-Fit driver. The 460 cc driver features a deep face and slightly elongated club head. The glossy charcoal finish on the VR_S appears really sharp. Nike’s new NexCOR technology replaces the compression channel found on previous Nike models. NexCor face technology is an ultra-thin and ultra-hot clubface designed to produce higher ball speed. In addition, NexCor technology maximizes ball speed for players of all ability levels. The new STR8-FIT system offers a 4-degree range of face-angle adjustability, optimizing ball speed, distance and accuracy for your personal swing style. In standard position the VR_S sets up 1 degree open. Overall, this club looks great.

Performance

I tested the Nike 9.5 VR_S driver with stock Fubuki stiff shaft. The VR_S provides a longer than average results in the distance department with a  mid ball flight and launch angle. The biggest surprise was the accuracy.  Off center hits still found the desired target. There were no snap hooks or missed shots to the right. The club head and shaft were a great match and complement each other well. The VR_S performed consistently with a nice match of distance, workability and forgiveness. Ball flight was straight or slight fade, which for me, is typical.

Feel

The VR_S features a mid weight 57 gram shaft with a heavy D6 swing weight. I prefer a slightly heavier feel and Nike designed a heavier club than many of the competitors, so this really fit the bill for me. The heavier weight makes the club very easy to feel throughout the swing. I found this driver forgiving, as off-center shots still flew very straight. The VR_S has a softer sound at impact than previous Nike drivers.

Value

There are so many good drivers it can be a challenge to find the best driver to complement your game. In my opinion, the Nike VR_S exceeded my expectations and is one of the best drivers I have tested. The Nike VR_S is definitely worth a few swings if you are searching for a new driver. While the going rate for most adjustable drivers is $399, the VR_S is a steal at a $299 retail value. With an inexpensive price tag and how the club performs the Nike VR_S driver is definitely one to consider if you’re in the market.

TaylorMade R11S Driver Review

Hey everyone, thanks for stopping by, today we’ve got an independent review of the TaylorMade R11s.  This driver came on the heels of the new RBZ line, and by the sounds of this review, it my have been a mistake by TaylorMade.  Enjoy!

Looks

The TaylorMade r11s driver, the next generation of the R11 features plenty of innovation on the 460 cc club head design. Similar to any TaylorMade wood these days, the R11s features an all white crown with black clubface. The club head utilizes a triangular shape that provides a higher MOI by utilizing deeper, farther-forward CG position.

The Adjustable Sole Plate (ASP) technology allows you to adjust the face angle independently of the loft, and vice versa. The five face angles are made possible by the improved ASP Technology of the R11S are neutral, slightly open, open, slightly closed and closed. The ASP is a red adjustable plate found on the sole of the club.

Flight Control Technology (FCT) allows you to change the orientation of the driver head with the shaft to effectively adjust the loft up or down, giving you 8 choices of lie and loft and face angles that range from +/- 1.5° of lie and +/- 1.5° of loft and +/- 3° of face angle.

The R11s features two weight ports, one in the toe and one in the heel. The Moveable Weight Technology allows you to change the 1 gram and 10 gram weight to manipulate ball flight.

Performance

I tested the R11s 9 degree driver with the stiff TaylorMade RIP Phenom 60 gram stock shaft. I mainly tested the club in a neutral face angle, standard loft and lie and draw bias with 10 gram weight in heel and 1 gram weight in toe weight port.

The R11s is designed to allow the player to manipulate ball flight. Testing yielded basically a mid ball flight with minimal movement. With a few of the adjustments of the club, I was able to produce a much higher launch and ball flight. I struggled with a slight push on many of the shots. Distance was average. Maybe my experience with the RBZ spoiled it, but the R11s failed to meet my expectations. In reality for my game and swing, the RBZ stock specifications outperformed the R11s stock specifications. I’m not sure if this club release was really necessary, as it was not much of an improvement on the original.

The R11s might feel a bit overwhelming when you first purchase the club. However, the instructions are fairly simple to follow. The easy to follow instructions show you exactly what adjustments to make to achieve your desired ball flight. Overall, I was actually disappointed with this drivers performance.

Feel

The R11s has a heavier feel with a D4 swing weight. Impact produces a very loud crack (almost too lound, in my opinion). The ball feels fairly consistent due to TaylorMade’s patented Inverted Cone Technology, which promotes a larger sweet spot on off-center hits. There was not a big difference on off-center hits.

Value

The TaylorMade R11s is one of the most technologically advanced drivers available today. Technology comes with a price, which makes it one of the most expensive drivers as well with a retail value of $399.99 (but by comparison to the $499 pricetag of the R7, I guess this is pretty reasonable). While I struggled with the R11′s consistency, I realize it is still a great driver. Some clubs fit swings better than others and I would probably benefit from a slightly different shaft. The R11s has a solid representation at all levels, including the Professional Tours. The price tag will scare some players away and the RBZ is an excellent alternative from TaylorMade.