taylormade rescue 11

TaylorMade Rescue 11 Review

Hi everyone – thanks for stopping by. This morning we are reviewing the TaylorMade Rescue 11. This club is very adjustable and stands out with TaylorMade’s white club head. Don’t forget, we love to hear reader’s feedback and encourage you to let us know your thoughts below. Here’s our take on the TaylorMade Rescue 11.

Looktaylormade rescue 11

Everyone has something to say about the all white club head of TaylorMade’s product line. It has been a great marketing strategy to set their product apart from the competition. I have heard many people say, “I can’t look down at this all white club head.” If this is what you are focused on, you are probably doomed to hit a poor shot anyway. Yes its different, but it shouldn’t affect performance one bit. The black clubface really does a nice job of framing the club in the address position. In addition, the black clubface and white crown make alignment fairly easy.

The TaylorMade Rescue 11 provides a traditional hybrid appearance. Players will feel confident they can hit a good shot. The Flight Control Technology of the Rescue 11 allows for a 4 degree face angle change which is noticeable at address. The club looks sharp, I’ll rate it 10 out of 10.

Performance

The trend in golf equipment these days is adjustable technology. The TaylorMade Rescue 11 is loaded with Flight Control Technology to help you hit the ball farther and straighter. The Rescue 11 allows you to alter loft by + or – 1 degree. There is a possible eight different combinations to alter ball flight.

The 18 degree Rescue 11 contains a deep face and lower center of gravity to get the ball up in the air. The neutral setting provides a high ball flight. Searching for more distance and spin, I added a degree of loft which increased ball flight and carry distance. My natural ball flight is straight to slight fade and I found it easy to replicate my normal shot pattern. However, I found it difficult to turn the ball over and produce a draw. Decreasing loft produced more of a consistent fade, which might be beneficial for someone who fights turning the ball over. The Rescue 11 does a nice job of hitting from any lie, including digging the ball out of the rough. With all the different options available for the Rescue 11, it rates in at 9 out of 10 in terms of performance.

Feel

The TaylorMade Rescue 11 has a nice weighting associated with the club. Personally, I prefer a slightly heavier feel to a club, and the Rescue 11 weighs in with a swing weight of D4. The weighting makes it easy to feel where the club head is throughout the entire swing. Impact has a solid feel and provides solid feedback even on off center hits. I rate the club 9 out of 10 in terms of feel.

Value

The TaylorMade Rescue 11 is a versatile hybrid that will provide players many different options. Players can be creative and even play an effective bump and run shot around the greens with the Rescue 11. The Flight Control Technology is invaluable for those searching to control ball flight. The cost is slightly higher than some of the competition at $189, however, there are many competitors that come in much higher. The Rescue 11 has a solid price point and is fairly easy to hit. It rates in at 9 out of 10 in terms of overall value.

Titleist 910H Hybrid

Titleist 910H Hybrid Review

Good morning everyone – thanks for stopping by. Its review time once again and today we will be looking at the Titleist 910H Hybrid. This club is excellent for lower handicap players. Here’s our take on the Titleist 910H Hybrid.

Lookstitleist 910h hybrid

By the looks of things, Titleist designed another winner. The 910H hybrid has the same glossy black finish as the 910 driver and fairway woods. In addition, the SureFit Tour hosel allows players to manipulate loft and lie into 16 different configurations. The deep face of the 910H gives the appearance you can hit the ball from any lie. In terms of appearance it rates 9 out of 10.

Performance

I will start by saying the Titleist 910H is probably a big hit or miss, either you love it or hate it. Low handicap players should really like the club while higher handicap players will probably find other hybrids much more appealing and easier to hit. The 910H is very versatile, allowing you to adjust the loft and lie of each hybrid. The 21 degree 4 hybrid can be adjusted up to 22.25 degrees or down to 20.25 degrees. In addition, the lie angle of the hybrid can be adjusted from a standard 58.5 degrees up to 60 degrees or down to 57.75 degrees.  The club is dependable from tight lies and the rough. The 910H gives a piercing to high ball flight and you still have the ability to manipulate based on preference. Accuracy could be a major concern for some players. Off center hits will not travel as well as other hybrids on the market. In comparison, a good ball striker will really have the ability to work the ball with the 910H. Players who use the 910H should find it one of the longest hybrids on the market. Overall a very solid club, it will not be for everyone, but rates 9 out of 10.

Feel

Titleist is often referred to as a players club and the 910H hybrid continues that trend. The 910H hybrid feels really solid with a heavier swing weight of D4. Better players often want to work the ball and control the distance, direction, and trajectory of the shot. The 910H Hybrid gives you every opportunity to control the ball. Players searching for an automatic club that hits the ball high and straight might be turned off. You can feel an off center hit and definitely see the results of poor contact. A well struck shot feels great, earning the club a 9 out of 10 rating.

Value

Hybrids are certainly easier to hit than a long iron. Titleist developed one of the most technologically advanced hybrids with the 910H. Consequently, it is one of the most expensive hybrids available with a retail value around $230. As a professional and low handicap player, I feel confident putting the 910H in my bag. However, I would not put it in all of my students hands. The 910H is a really nice club, but with such a steep price tag I rate it a 7 out of 10.

 

ping g20

Ping G20 Hybrid Review

Hello everyone – thanks for stopping by. Today we will be  looking at the Ping G20 Hybrid.

Looks

The Ping G20 Hybrid features an offset hosel design with a 17-4 stainless steel club head. The Gping g2020 resembles more of an iron than a traditional hybrid. The club face and top line appear like an iron with a satin finish. The back of the hybrid is a dark gray that blends in with the ground. Aesthetically, the satin finish on the club pops out. Compared to the previous G15 model the G20 has a slightly more compact and shallow club head design. However, compared to the majority of other hybrids available, it looks much more clunky and deep. Overall, as a low handicap player I am not a big fan of the appearance and offset design. The appearance rates 6 out of 10.

Performance

Luckily the G20 performs much better than it looks. I tested the 20 degree Ping G20 hybrid with a stiff TFC 169H stock shaft.  The G20 is designed as Ping’s game improvement hybrid. The G20 delivers a high launch and ball flight. In addition, it delivers maximum forgiveness. The G20 creates a very high and straight ball flight. If you are searching for a club to work the ball you may want to try Ping’s i20 hybrid. The G20 provides little ability to control the trajectory and shot pattern.

The G20 is extremely easy to hit and performs exceptional from a tight lie. It launches the ball high from just about any reasonable lie such as a bunker or even moderate rough. Although it is super easy to hit, it won’t provide any miracles out of a U.S. Open length rough.

Every high handicap player searching for a hybrid should give the G20 a try. The appearance and offset may scare away some players but the club is ideal for higher handicap players.  The performance of the G20 hybrid rates 9 out of 10.

Feel

The G20 creates a dull sound at impact. Due to the forgiveness of the G20, impact feels similar almost anywhere on the club face. The G20 features a D1 swing weight, which feels similar to other hybrids. Overall, you do not receive a lot of feedback, the G20 hybrid just produces a high and straight shot. The Ping G20 rates 8 out of 10.

Value

Many players struggle with hybrids.  Since the G20 resembles more of an iron, this may be a great alternative rather than a traditional hybrid. The club is super easy to hit and control. It provides good distance and keeps the ball in play. The G20 appearance is an improvement over the G15.  The price tag is right in line with the majority of other game improvement hybrids at $159. There are certainly a large number of golfers who will benefit from the G20. If they look past the unique appearance they will find a solid club that rates 8 out of 10.

Adams Idea a12 OS Hybrid

Hi everyone, thanks for stopping by – this morning we have another review for you. Today we will look at the Adam IDEA a12 OS Hybrid.

Look

Adams golf has been known for developing forgiving hybrid irons for years. They have practically cornered that niche of the market while other companies have steered clear of full hybrid iron sets.

The IDEA a12 OS features a unique gold finish with chrome club face. The gold finish is rather unique, however, that barely caught my attention when you view the velocity slot located on the crown just behind the club face. There is also a chamber on the sole of the club. The velocity slot chamber is designed to increase distance while offering the superior forgiveness. The velocity slot looks strange in the address position, however, after you hit a few balls you barely notice it. The appearance of the IDEA a12 OS rates 6 out of 10.

Performance

I tested the Adams IDEA a12 OS 6 (28 degree) hybrid ultra lite 50g high launch shaft. The Adams IDEA a12 OS performs as advertised – forgiving. The a12 generates a mid to high launch and generally produces straight shots. Off center hits create a lower ball flight. In addition, shots from tight lies often cause a low ball flight with more left to right movement. The hybrid design of the IDEA a12 helps get the ball in the air. The a12 OS is an easy club to hit and should perform great for higher handicap players. In addition, the a12 produces an average distance. However, it will potentially deliver more distance for someone who consistently produces wild shots. Straighter shots generally generate more distance. The IDEA a12 rates 8 out of 10 in terms of performance.

Feel

The Adams IDEA a12 OS features a lightweight shaft with a heavier feel in the club head. Adams utilizes a D1 swing weight in the a12. The company boasts the club is extremely forgiving. I agree, off center hits really felt very similar to shots struck in the sweet spot. Overall, the feel of the IDEA a12 OS felt average compared to other hybrids and rates 7 out of 10.

Value

Players are always searching for more forgiveness. The IDEA a12 OS hybrid offers plenty of forgiveness. The IDEA a12 OS is easy to hit and the low center of gravity gets the ball in the air. Anyone who struggles to get the ball in the air might benefit from Adams technology and should demo the IDEA a12 OS. The hybrid retails at 169.99.  Adams offers an 8 piece IDEA a12 OS set for $499.99 or a full 13 piece set for $899.99.  Adams developed a strong following for affordable and dependable clubs and the value of the IDEA a12 OS hybrid rates 8 out of 10.

Image Credit: http://goo.gl/tMlrst

ping_G25hybrids-header

ping-g25-hybrid-reviewHey everyone, thanks for stopping by, we’ve got another review to share with your from our friends at Ping. Today we are reviewing their G25 hybrid – and incredibly solid hybrid, that our reviewer really liked.  Keep your eyes on Ping in the new year as we expect to see a G30/G35 models on their way soon.  Enjoy the review below!

Look

The new Ping G25 hybrid resembles the shape and color of the i20 more than the previous G20 hybrid.  In fact, the change in design offers a desirable upgrade in aesthetics.  The simple design with flat black color scheme and white grooves looks great.  The G25 hybrid is modeled with a more traditional shape and made from 17-4 stainless steel.  An external weight is visible on the sole positioning the CG low and back on the club head.  The updated appearance inspires more confidence in comparison to the off-set and deep face of the G20 hybrid.  The previous G20 hybrid had a the look of a hook written all over it – the G25 is much better.

Performance

I tested the Ping G25 hybrid in a 20 degree loft with the stock TFC 189H in stiff flex.  The TFC 189H weighs 71 grams with 3.1 degrees of torque.  The stock shaft is available in soft regular through tour x-stiff.  The more flexible shafts are designed to produce a higher ball flight while the stiffer flex shafts offer lower ball flights.

The best feature of the Ping G20 hybrid was a solid and dependable performance.  While the performance in the G20 was solid, the G25’s updated appearance combined with the same great results is a home run for Ping.  Ball flight was generally a mid to high trajectory.  With the updated club head design, the G25 hybrid is still just as forgiving and easy to hit as any hybrid available on the market today.  Distance was above average and would make a great addition in any bag.  The Ping G25 line up is fantastic, the driver is amazing while the G25 hybrid is not far behind.

Feel

The Ping G25 hybrid weighs in with a D1 swing weight.  The club head and shaft combine for a solid feel throughout the swing.  While the G25 driver makes your ears ring at impact, the hybrid produces the similar dull ping sound as the G20, however, with better feedback and softer feel.  Off center hits also have an enhanced sensation and softer feel than the firm feel of the G20.

Value

Last season’s G20 suffered in the sales department because of its awkward appearance.  Ping updated the G25 hybrid with outstanding looks to accompany outstanding results, making the G25 one of the hottest hybrids available today.  The Ping G25 hybrid retails with an average price point with a $199 price tag.  The G25 does not offer adjustments and still outperforms many of the more expensive competitors.  Overall value is up there with the best hybrids of 2013.

 

rbz-stage-two-hybrid-non-tour

Hey everyone, hope you’re enjoying your weekendf and spring break.  As a follow-up to a previous post on the RBZ Stage 2 Tour Hybrid review we did, here is our review of the non-Tour version from our independent reviewer.  As you may recall, our reviewer was a little disappointed with the Stage 2 tour version of the hybrid, so let’s hope (for TaylorMade’s sake) that this hybrid stacks up a little better.  Let’s get to it…

Looks

The TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 Rescue features a black clubface and sole with a non-glare white crown.  The grey and yellow alignment graphic offers a youthful appearance.  TaylorMade continued with the speed pocket positioned just behind the club face.  In addition, a weight is located directly behind the speed pocket designed to move the center of gravity lower and more forward producing faster ball speeds, higher launch and low spin.  Compared to the previous RBZ Rescue, the new Stage 2 is not as round.  However, the size and shape appears identical to the Stage 2 Tour Rescue.  The club sets up nice at address and appears easy to hit, and if I had a complaint it would be that the crown graphics are a little distracting and unnecessary, but this seems to be TaylorMade’s trend this year (R1 graphics for example).

Performance

For this review, I tested the TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 19 degree Rescue with a stiff RocketFuel shaft.  The RocketFuel shaft weighs 62 grams with 3.2 degrees of torque.  In my books, the performance and feel between the Stage 2 and Stage 2 Tour are completely reversed.  I expected better results from the Tour version being a scratch golfer, but was shocked that the Stage 2 outperformed it’s Tour counterpart.

The RBZ Stage 2 Hybrid produced a piercing mid to high ball flight.  The majority of shots produced a straight ball flight or draw.  Unlike the Stage 2 Tour Rescue, the regular Stage 2 Rescue does not balloon.  The club performs great off the tee and is easy to hit from tight lies or regular length rough.  In fact, it seemed easier to hit from a tight lie than the previous RBZ Rescue.  This club really performed well in my books, I couldn’t put it down.

Feel

The RBZ Stage 2 Rescue feels solid at impact with a crisp contact.  In addition, it feels harder off the face than the RBZ Stage 2 Tour Rescue.  The RBZ Stage 2 Tour has an incredibly smooth feel and very few hybrids will duplicate the same feeling.  The D4 swing weight is the exact same as the Tour version.  Overall, the feel of the club is solid, not quite as nice as the RBZ Stage 2 Tour, but pretty darn good, and this time the feel matched up with performance.

Value

The RBZ Stage 2 Rescue is forgiving and easy to hit.  The piercing ball flight provides plenty of distance.  Based on my results, the regular RBZ Stage 2 Rescue outperformed the more expensive Tour version.  Compared to other hybrids the rescue is also very competitive in the price department, carry a price tag of only $199.99, which is great price for the club’s performance.  I would highly recommended looking into this hybrid if you’re in the market, I was very impressed.

rbz-stage-two-hybrid

Hi everyone, with spring right around the corner, you’re likely itching to hit the range and start swinging, much like myself.  Hopefully the snow storm in the northeast didn’t dampen your spirits too bad.  Today we’re going to share with you a review of the TaylorMade Stage 2 RBZ Tour Hybrid from our independent reviewer.  As you will read, this club left a little to be desired.  Enjoy the review, and read about the non-Tour version in a new post in a couple of days.

Look

rbx-stage-two-hybrid-reviewThe new TaylorMade Stage 2 Tour Hybrid is almost identical in club head size to the previous RBZ hybrid.  It also maintains the white crown and black club face.  Similar to the regular Stage 2 hybrid, the sole is a combination of black and white with a gray and yellow trim.  The speed pocket remains just behind the club face with a weight port positioned just behind the chamber.

TaylorMade updated the white crown to include a grey stripe with yellow trim that runs across the top of the club head.  Visually, it attracts the eye forward to the club face, but seems a little unnecessary and over-the-top.  The design is slightly more square and shallow than the previous RBZ hybrid.  The RocketFuel shaft is all black with yellow and grey trim.

Performance

The lower and forward center of gravity in the TaylorMade Stage 2 Tour Hybrid is designed to produce a higher launch, low spin, faster ball speed and more distance.  I tested the TaylorMade Stage 2 RBZ Tour 3 – 18.5 degree hybrid with a stiff flex RocketFuel 80 gram shaft.  The club was tested in 4 positions, standard, upright, +1.5 degrees and – 1.5 degrees.

In the standard position, shots were high and straight or slight fade.  Switching to the upright position produced a lower ball flight than the standard position, but still delivered a fade.  Switching the position to the 20 degree setting (+1.5 degree) produced a higher ball flight, however, adding the extra loft probably made the club a little more forgiving and produced mostly straight shots.  Surprisingly, the 17 degree setting (-1.5 degrees) produced the best results.  Shots were typically straight or slight draw with a mid to high ball flight.

Overall, results produced a high launch and ball flight.  Ball flight often ballooned and forgiveness was average, I had sort of mixed feeling about this club after the tests, I wasn’t sold.  A number of shots missed the target and produced an unwanted fade or slice.

Feel

The Stage 2 RBZ Tour hybrid sets up nice at address and feels comfortable with the heavier 80 gram shaft.  Impact feels great with a crisp ‘ping’ sound.  Unfortunately, I felt the TaylorMade Stage 2 RBZ Tour hybrid felt much better at impact than it performed. At impact, every ball felt solid, like it should fly straight and long, but for the most part, this wasn’t the result.  I much preferred the feel over other hybrids such as the regular RBZ Stage 2 hybrid and Titleist 913H, but again, the other hybrids produced better results.

Value

Players will enjoy the ability to manipulate the club with 7 different settings and personalize the club for individual preference.  The higher launch and ball flight will benefit some players.  In my opinion, I have hit other hybrids that outperform the Stage 2 RBZ Tour.  Impact feels really smooth.  The TaylorMade Stage 2 RBZ Tour Hybrid retails for $229.99 which is $30 more than the regular Stage 2 RBZ hybrid.  While the RBZ Stage 2 Tour is supposedly RocketBallz-IER, personally I didn’t see it on the range for this review.  I’d recommend testing out both the RBZ Stage 2 and RBZ Stage 2 Tour if you’re interested in this club, you may find, much like I did, that the non-tour version is just as good, if not better.

Ping I20 Hybrid Review

Hey everyone, thanks for stopping by – today we’ve got another review to share, of the Ping i20 Hybrid.

Looks

Similar to the entire Ping i20 line, their hybrids look fantastic. It features a low profile and compact head very pleasing to the eye. The entire Ping i20 line features an all black matte finish that prevents/reduces glare from the club head. Personally, I love the all black look, small club-face and the club pops at address with white grooves on the club face.

Performance

I tested the 20 degree Ping i20 hybrid with the stock TFC 707 H shaft in stiff flex. This club is meant to replace either your 3-iron, or if you carry one a 7-wood. A club is much easier to hit when you look down and like the appearance. The shallow face with a low and deep center of gravity helps get the ball up in the air from even the tightest lies. In comparison to the i15, I found it more consistent and forgiving. The majority of clubs have continued to get bigger, however, I really liked the compact head, which appeared slightly smaller than the i15. The i20 produces a mid to high ball flight. Players who prefer to work the ball should like the i20′s ability to manipulate ball flight. The Ping i20 hybrid is fairly easy to hit, long and produces less spin than the other Ping hybrids.

Feel

The i20 has a great feel through impact. The ball jumps off the face and makes a nice dull, yet crisp sound at impact. Shots off the toe and heel still felt good without and huge loss of distance or direction. Compared to competitors the i20 has an average weight, with a swing weight of D1 and a shaft that weighs in at 75 grams. If forgiveness is something you’re really after with the your hybrids, the G20 or K15 might be a better option for your bag. The i20 is definitely built for better players, that have more consistent swings and want to work the ball.

Value

The i20 hybrid is one of the best looking hybrids available and it delivers in very solid performance and feel as well. The Ping i20 hybrid retails at $189 and is priced slightly higher than the average price among competitors. However, compared to the hybrids geared to lower handicap players, the price tag is directly in line with the competition. While it is not for everyone, the i20 should find a successful niche with the lower to mid handicap players. The look alone should peak everyone’s interest.

 

1851-1022892

Cobra T-rail ReviewHey everyone, thanks for stopping by, today we’ve got a a review of the Cobra T-Rail Baffler Hybrid line. Enjoy!

Looks

You gotta love the new Cobra Baffler T-Rail Hybrid. With it’s traditional dark color, flared with streaks of bright yellow, it’s really hard to miss out on the golf course. Cobra is known for developing great hybrids over the years, and in my opinion, the Baffler T-Rail continues this tradition. The men’s version features a black club head, silver club face with florescent yellow alignment aids on the club head. The stock shaft is a black and silver Graphite Design Tour AD shaft with a bright yellow grip. The ladies Baffler features an all silver club head, shaft with bright green accent alignment marks and green grip (but we didn’t give this one a test). The shape is fairly consistent with previous baffler models. The baffler sets up nicely at address and screams “easy-to-hit”.

Read More →

Looks

RBZ Rescue-Hybrid-ReviewBy now most players that see “white” think TaylorMade. This is becoming more than a fad, and looks as though its going to stick around for quite some time. The white and black colors of the RBZ Rescue make alignment easy, and in all honestly, look great over the ball. What can I say? I’m a fan of the white look.

The RBZ hybrid features a sole-positioned Speed Pocket behind the clubface that is designed to increase ball speed (a feature you see on top of the club for Adams’ line). The center of gravity is positioned low and forward to increase launch but decrease spin. Consistent with other TaylorMade hybrids, the RBZ looks great and is slightly larger than the average hybrid. I tested a stiff 19-degree 3-hybrid Rescue, D4 swing weight (standard across the entire line) with the stock RBZ 65 shaft.

Read More →